City of Things use cases

Concrete examples of how technology is improving life in the city

A mobile sensor to measure different aspects of air quality

Current partners: imec, bpost, UAntwerpen, UGent

Clean air concerns us all. Although we are vaguely aware that a potential lack of clean air is one of city life’s main drawbacks, very few of us actually know what the air quality in our own neighborhood is like. To close this information gap, imec has designed a sensor box that measures different aspects of air quality.

By installing these sensors across the city, we can gather real-time and fine-grained data. The sensors can be either static or mobile. For instance, in one of our projects, the sensor boxes were placed on the roof of a number of bpost vans, Belgium’s national mail delivery company. While these vans go about their daily routine, the sensors continuously measure air quality, gathering data from a larger geographical area than a single, fixed sensor could ever cover.

Once processed, the results are made available as an open set of environmental data. By making these data publicly available and easily accessible, their impact with all potential stakeholders is increased:

  • Citizens can use the results to adjust their daily life routines. For example, they might choose to cycle to work along a different route with healthier air.
  • Researchers can translate the real-time open data sets into new research opportunities.
  • Companies can use them to develop new, innovative business models.

Could this project be your next big research or business opportunity? Could your idea take smart city innovation to the next level?

Contact Nik van den Wijngaert (Business Development Manager City of Things).

Bike sensors improve quality of life in the city

Current partners: imec, UAntwerpen, UGent

Communication is essential to bridge the gap between citizens and smart city services. In this project, we use cyclists to collect real-time contextual data on the city environment. This can be a combination of user-initiated input and data collected automatically through technology mounted on the bikes (e.g. sensors, location trackers, etc.).

The strength of this project is that it enables real-time interaction between the city council, smart city services and the participating cyclists. This provides the smart city with valuable information regarding, for example, infrastructure improvements or green wave smart mobility.

Could this project be your next big research or business opportunity?

Could your idea take smart city innovation to the next level?

Contact Nik van den Wijngaert (Business Development Manager City of Things).

Using location and event-based triggers to stimulate interaction with citizens

Current partners: imec, UAntwerpen, UGent

A smart city is a city that meets the needs of its citizens. Interaction with citizens is essential to achieve this. Imec has a wide range of experience in living lab research, focusing on user involvement.

Within the City of Things program, we collaborated on a smartphone application, called WAPPR, that makes it possible to communicate citizens in a more direct way. The application allows users to consult smart city information and to interact with it by reacting on location, beacon and event based triggers that are set up across the city, so direct feedback can be given to the city council. They can share their dreams for the city, indicate their priorities, report problems, provide feedback on city services, etc.

Could this project be your next big research or business opportunity?

Could your idea take smart city innovation to the next level?

Contact Nik van den Wijngaert (Business Development Manager City of Things).

This website uses cookies for analytics purposes only without any commercial intent. Find out more here.

Accept cookies